Brigita's Blog: Horse Owners - Are You Ready For Spring?

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Horse Owners - Are You Ready For Spring?

 

Horse Owners - Are You Ready For Spring?

 

                           Horse Owners - Are You Ready For Spring?

 

Believe it or not, it is almost spring after most of us had a rough, long winter.  With the oncoming nice weather, it is time to start a "spring check-up".  This involves inspecting your pastures, fencing, barn, tack and facilities for maintenance and repair.

 

Every spring, horse owners should get in the habit of preparing the pastures, equipment and horses to be enjoyed during the warmer weather.  

 

Check fencing to prepare for spring turnoutsThe first thing would be to check the fencing and pastures.  Winter storms can bring down trees onto fences, or deer can run through, breaking the fencing.  If wire or electric fencing is used, check to make sure it is property working and not shorted out.  Horses will know when the fence is shorted at which point will decide to go exploring on their own.  Fencing should be checked at least once a week, thereafter.

 

Since horses have not been out to pasture during the cold winter months, and have been eating mostly hay, they will need to be introduced to the fresh green grasses.  The horses digestive system will need to be introduced slowly to the lush grass since their systems are not used to it.  Start our by limiting their time on the grass, usually starting out at about 15-20 minutes or so at a time.  Then slowly increase the grazing time period to about 10-15 minutes every few days.  This way, after about a month's time, the horse's digestive system will have acclimated to several hours of grazing time.

 

Have your veterinarian visit in spring for annual vaccinations and examinationsSpring is also a good time for the annual visit from your veterinarian for vaccinations and yearly exam.  (Consult your veterinarian as to which inoculations are required and necessary for your area.)  This is also the time to include the negative Coggins testing, which is required to participate in horse shows and various horse events.  

 

This is also a good time to have your farrier come out.  If the horse's shoes were pulled, now would be a good time to have them put back on prior to starting their heavy work schedule.  Also, many owners tend to somewhat neglect the hoof health of their horses during the winter months.  Good time to have them checked out.

 

Daily grooming is necessary during the spring months to help the horses shed their winter coats.  This is also a good way to check the condition of their skin as well as helping in finding parasites.  Spring and fall are the times when ticks are most prevalent.

 

Lastly, the spring months are a good time to do spring barn cleaning, by Clean and check equipment and tack and get them repaired in spring before the riding season beginsremoving the cob webs, dead insects, dirt and dust, sweeping out the barn, plus checking throughout the barn for any repairs that may need to be done.  This is also the time to check and clean equipment and tack.  If repairs are needed, get it done before the riding begins.

 

 

 

Brigita McKelvie is a REALTOR®  (Pennsylvania License #RS297130) with Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, specializing in rural and horse properties and farms in Eastern Pennsylvania.  She has an e-Pro® (Certified Internet Expert) certification and a GRI (Graduate, REALTOR® Institute) designation.  

Brigita McKelvie, REALTOR

Pennsylvania License #RS297130

Rural and Horse Properties and Farms

 

Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, Ltd.Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, Ltd.

 

The Premier Equine and Country Real Estate firm serving Eastern Pennsylvania from back yard operations to world class equestrian facilities.

Use a REALTOR with "horse sense" that doesn't horse around when it comes to horse properties.

 

 

e-ProGRI (Graduate, REALTOR Institute)BNI

 

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Comment balloon 8 commentsBrigita McKelvie, Associate Broker • February 27 2018 06:50PM

Comments

Great reminders for folks lucky enough to care for horses!

Posted by Kristin Johnston - REALTOR®, Giving Back With Each Home Sold! (RE/MAX Realty Center ) 7 months ago

Good morning, Kristin!

Many of us are itching to get back on our horses.  Before we do, now is a good time to get these things done.

Brigita

Posted by Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker, The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around (Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd.) 7 months ago

Great advice. Thanks for sharing.

Posted by Paul Antonelli, Broker Owner; NextHome Antonelli Realty (NextHome Antonelli Realty) 7 months ago

Good afternoon Brigita - I am sure that the horse owners in our family are at the barn doing many of these things.

Posted by Grant Schneider, Your Coach Helping You Create Successful Outcomes (Performance Development Strategies) 7 months ago

I rode when I was young, but did not realize you need to introduce horse slowly to pasture to adjust their digestive systems, our winters weren't so harsh in England so maybe our horses were out over the winter period.

Posted by Nick & Trudy Vandekar, 610-203-4543, Tredyffrin Easttown Realtors, Philly Main Line (Long & Foster Real Estate Inc 610-225-7400) 7 months ago

Good morning, Paul!

Thank you for stopping by.

Brigita

Posted by Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker, The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around (Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd.) 7 months ago

Good morning, Grant!

Sounds like they may have a head start.  They will be ready for spending more time with the horses during the nice spring weather sooner than later.  

Brigita

Posted by Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker, The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around (Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd.) 7 months ago

Good morning, Nick & Trudy!

If the horses were on pasture during the winter, then they are slowly introducint the grass as it grows in.  Most of us here in the Northeast do not let the horses out in the pastures during winter because as the snow and ice melt, the ground turns wet.  With the horses walking and grazing on the grass it will destroy the new growth, turning the ground into mud, hence, no pasture.

Brigita

Posted by Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker, The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around (Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd.) 7 months ago

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