Brigita's Blog: Getting the Property Ready for My Horses to Come Home

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Getting the Property Ready for My Horses to Come Home

 

Getting the Property Ready for My Horses to Come Home

 

Now that we had found our horse property in Eastern Pennsylvania, the real work was about to begin.  It was time to prepare the acreage so that I would be able to bring my horse home.  Local zoning stated that in order for the property to be grandfathered in for horses, I had six months to get my horses  onto the property.  This did not give us much time considering how much had to be done.  The previous owner's horses were removed from the property just before settlement.  Time was ticking away and the work had to start quickly.

 

The first thing we tackled was replacing fencing around the pastures and taking out the existing fencing, since that was pretty much falling down.  We opted for electric fencing, since that could be installed rather quickly (we were doing the work ourselves) and was the least expensive type of fence we could install.  If we only knew . . . . .

 

We began to work in the area where the paddock would be.  (The paddock is what we call the "sacrifice area".  This is the area that the horses would be housed in when they are not turned out into the pasture.  Because there is a lot of consistent traffic in this area, grass will not grow here.  Hence "sacrifice area".)

 

Things started out quite well.  It was going a lot quicker and easier than we thought, until . .  . . . .  we hit a spot where the fence post did not go into the ground.  No matter what we tried, even moving it several inches here and there, it could not be budged into the ground.  Now, Pennsylvania consists of various different types of terrain.  It can be swampy.  It can be hilly.  It can be mountainous.  It can be rocky.  You name it and Pennsylvania probably has it somewhere.  Well, we found the rocky part of it.  We couldn't even break the rock.  We finally found a spot several feet from where it was originally supposed to go.  It didn't go in easily, but with some effort, it did go into the ground.  Whew!!  It only took a few hours to get one post in.

 

Halfway around the pastures, we encountered another issue putting in the fence posts.  You see, the one area in the middle of the pasture were underground springs, which turned into a stream along the way.  As you may have guessed, this area was swampy.  No problem getting a fence post in here.  The only problem was it sank in.  Not a good thing.  Once again, we had to find a good spot to put in the fence post so it would stay up on its own.  Another hour before the perfect spot was found.  

 

This went on for 3-4 days.  We either hit rocky areas, where it was a challenge to find a spot the post would go into the ground, or a swampy area, where the post just refused to stand upright.

 

After the fence was installed, we had another challenge to conquer.  I won't tell you what that was.  You'll have to wait for the next part to find out.

Brigita McKelvie is a REALTOR®  (Pennsylvania License #RS297130) with Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, specializing in rural and horse properties and farms in Eastern Pennsylvania.  She has an e-Pro® (Certified Internet Expert) certification and a GRI (Graduate, REALTOR® Institute) designation.  

Brigita McKelvie, REALTOR

Pennsylvania License #RS297130

Rural and Horse Properties and Farms

 

Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, Ltd.Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, Ltd.

 

The Premier Equine and Country Real Estate firm serving Eastern Pennsylvania from back yard operations to world class equestrian facilities.

Use a REALTOR with "horse sense" that doesn't horse around when it comes to horse properties.

 

 

e-ProGRI (Graduate, REALTOR Institute)BNI

 

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Comment balloon 12 commentsBrigita McKelvie, Associate Broker • February 06 2018 02:48PM

Comments

Checking the barns for hazards and then the fencing are just the starting blocks of this move

Posted by William Feela, Realtor, Whispering Pines Realty 651-674-5999 No. (WHISPERING PINES REALTY) 9 months ago

How wonderful to have your horses with you! Sounds like you are making progress - even when it is rocky! 

Posted by Lise Howe, Assoc. Broker and Attorney Licensed in DC, MD, VA, (Keller Williams Capital Properties) 9 months ago

Great information as always, and I sure with I had horses in my life!

Posted by Kristin Johnston - REALTOR®, Giving Back With Each Home Sold! (RE/MAX Realty Center ) 9 months ago

Hi, William!

The fencing was only the begining.  There is more to come.

Brigita

Posted by Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker, The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around (Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd.) 9 months ago

Hi, Lisa!

This was one challenge that was overcome in getting the property ready.  Wait till you hear the rest.

Brigita

Posted by Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker, The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around (Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd.) 9 months ago

Hi, Kristin!

Thank you.  At least you are living it through me.

Brigita

Posted by Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker, The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around (Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd.) 9 months ago

Brigita,

We are on pins and needles waiting for you next installment.  I had an idea that a horse property is not the easiest thing in the world to maintain and have.  It looks like you and your husband conquered it all.  Congratulations.  A

Posted by Ron and Alexandra Seigel, Luxury Real Estate Branding, Marketing & Strategy (Napa Consultants) 9 months ago

This sounds both frustrating and exhausting! I bet you look forward to having all this part behind you!

Posted by Sharon Tara, New Hampshire Home Stager (Sharon Tara Transformations) 9 months ago

Good afternoon Brigita - sounds like you have a great project there in taking care of your horses.

Posted by Grant Schneider, Your Coach Helping You Create Successful Outcomes (Performance Development Strategies) 9 months ago

Good morning, Ron & Alexandra!

This is only the beginning.  Stay tuned for much more to come.

Brigita

Posted by Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker, The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around (Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd.) 9 months ago

Good morning, Sharon!

Yes, it was very tiring and frustrating.  I must add that once it is done, it is well worth it.  Just having my horses with me on my property is worth the work.

Brigita

Posted by Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker, The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around (Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd.) 9 months ago

Good morning, Grant!

It is a project that is well worth it.

Brigita

Posted by Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker, The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around (Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd.) 9 months ago

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