Brigita's Blog: Extreme Heat Expected - Make Sure To Keep Horses Hydrated and Cool

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Extreme Heat Expected - Make Sure To Keep Horses Hydrated and Cool

 

Extreme Heat Expected - Make Sure To Keep Horses Hydrated and Cool

 

                              Extreme Heat Expected - Make Sure To Keep Horses Hydrated

 

 

Extreme heat and humidity is expected to begin today, in Eastern Pennsylvania, and run straight through the weekend into the beginning of next week.  Warnings are issued to avoid exerting ourselves during this time, to check on the elderly and to bring pets indoors.

 

Care must also be taken for horses and livestock.  Even though they are outdoor animals, they feel the extreme heat also.  Steps are to be taken to make sure the horses are kept as comfortable as possible during the extreme heat.

 

Start by making sure that there is plenty of water available.  The body of a horse is comprised of 65-70% water.  Therefore, it requires free access to water and should be able to drink as much as it needs.  The hotter and more humid, the more it will require.  Check the water supply throughout the day.

 

Next, the horses should be able to have some sort of shelter or shade to be able to get out of the hot sun.  Just like humans, they can get overheated standing in the sun.  Good sources of shade would be trees, run-in sheds, overhangs from barns, or keeping the horses in the stalls.  A great help would be to have some sort of air circulating in the structure, wuch as fans, to help keep the horses cool.  

 

Avoid working the horses in the hottest part of the day.  If the horse must be worked, do it in the early morning hours when it is coolest, or in the latter part of the evening.  

 

If at all possible, hose the horses down during the day to help them keep cool.  Since they are unable to take a dip in the pool like humans can, the hosing will help them considerably.  Remember to scrape the excess water off after hosing.  Keeping the excess water on their body will be counter-productive and will heat the horse instead.

 

Horses can get heatstroke, so it is up to us to try to keep them as cool and comfortable as possible during the extreme heat of summer.

 

 

 

 

Brigita McKelvie is a REALTOR®  (Pennsylvania License #RS297130) with Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, specializing in rural and horse properties and farms in Eastern Pennsylvania.  She has an e-Pro® (Certified Internet Expert) certification and a GRI (Graduate, REALTOR® Institute) designation.  

Brigita McKelvie, REALTOR

Pennsylvania License #RS297130

Rural and Horse Properties and Farms

 

Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, Ltd.Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, Ltd.

 

The Premier Equine and Country Real Estate firm serving Eastern Pennsylvania from back yard operations to world class equestrian facilities.

Use a REALTOR with "horse sense" that doesn't horse around when it comes to horse properties.

 

 

e-ProGRI (Graduate, REALTOR Institute)BNI

 

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Comment balloon 4 commentsBrigita McKelvie, Associate Broker • July 22 2016 06:26AM

Comments

It is very dry in Arizona, so when others are visiting and not used to it being so dry, I tell them how important it is to stay well hydrated, even when you feel that you don't need it.

Posted by Brian England, MBA, GRI, REALTOR® Real Estate in East Valley AZ (Arizona Focus Realty) over 1 year ago

Brian,

Keeping hydrated is so important during the heat.  I enjoy hiking and the one time my daughter and I were hiking a difficult trail on a hot day.  We brought along plenty of water to drink along the way (orso we thought).  We were trekking along well as long as we were drinking water.  Towards the end, we ran out, at which point we started dragging.  Our energy levels decreased substantially.  Once we were able to rehydrate, we were feeling fine.

Brigita

Posted by Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker, The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around (Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd.) over 1 year ago

Hi Brigita McKelvie!

Thanks for a great post about to help protect horses against the extreme temperatures!

A friend of ours has horses in Prescott Valley - and while the temps are usually lower than here - they can still get way up there!

We like your writing style!

We wish you great success with your blog posts and networking with other members of Active Rain!

We clicked the “Follow” button on your profile so that we will be alerted to your future blog posts and can read and comment on them, and we invite you to "follow us" - should you be interested - by clicking the “Follow” button you see underneath our photo to the left. There is no requirement or obligation for you to do so, but we would be honored if you choose to do so!

Posted by Tony and Suzanne Marriott, Associate Brokers, Serving Scottsdale, Phoenix and Maricopa County AZ (Haven Express @ Keller Williams Arizona Realty) over 1 year ago

Good morning, Tony & Suzanne!

Thank you.  We are currently experiencing extreme heat and humidity.  Trying to keep the horses as well as the other animals as cool and comfortable as possible during this time.

Thank you for following me.  I have done the same.  Wishing you the best and looking forward to networking with you.

Brigita

Posted by Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker, The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around (Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd.) over 1 year ago

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