Brigita's Blog: February 2016

Nazareth area Residential properties, Nazareth area horse properties, Lehigh Valley residential properties, Lehigh Valley horse properties, Nazareth area horse farms, Nazareth area farms, Nazareth area rural homes, Lehigh Valley rural homes, Nazareth area real estate, Lehigh Valley real estate, Nazareth area schools, horse properties, equestrian properties, horse farms, Nazareth REALTOR, rural homes, rural properties, equestrian farms,

Steps To Take To Search For a Horse Farm in Eastern Pennsylvania

 

Steps To Take To Search For a Horse Farm in Eastern Pennsylvania

 

Over the years, I have helped various horse people.  Some were professionals, some amateurs, some starting out and learning about horses or returning to horse ownership, while others were either parents or related to children that were purely horse crazy.

 

When searching for a horse farm or property in Pennsylvania for your horses, there are steps that should be taken.  

 

Searching for A Horse Property or Farm in Eastern PennsylvaniaTo start with, decide as to the type of farm or property would be right for you and your horse's needs, making sure there will be ample room for your specific requirements.  Some of them can be barns and outbuildings, pastures and paddocks, indoor and/or outdoor riding arenas, close access to trails, horse friendly area.  Whatever your particular needs require.  

 

Now it's time to find a lender that specializes in these types of properties.  Beware!  Not all lenders finance agricultural properties or farms with acreages.  Therefore, make sure the lender is aware of the type of property you are intending to buy.

 

Next, find a real estate professional that is knowledgeable about these types of properties or specializes in them.  They are familiar with the Eastern Pennsylvania farm and horse property real estate market as well as knowledgeable about available amenities in the search area as well as service people and companies, such as large animal veterinarians. farriers, feed and tack stores, etc.  They can also point you in the right direction for good horseback riding trails, lesson and training barns, horse events and shows, and so much more.  

 

The agent will then take the Buyer out to see the properties of interest.  Check the barns and outbuildings to see if they will be safe for your horses, as well as whether or not there is plenty of room for them and storage.  It is usually a good idea to have a separate building for a large supply of hay storage, but not a must.  Will it be necessary to build a new barn?  Is there enough room to turn the horses out?  Is there electricity and water at the barn or will you have to install those items?  Is there a place for storage of feed that would be out of harms way of the horses?  (The last thing you want is the horses to help themselves to the grain.  Not a good idea.)  

 

Check out the land to see if they are suitable for horses.  Wetlands and rocky land is not a good match for horses.  (Some areas in Pennsylvania do have these types of lots.  So be careful.)  Think of it this way,  If you would not want to stand in it or on it day after day, then it would not be good for horses.  Some horse owners like to have the land sloped so the horses keep fit going up and down the slopes.

 

Let's say you found your ideal property.  Before even putting in an offer, check with the local zoning ordinances.  Is the property zoned for horses?  If so, how many are allowed?  If it is not zoned for your needs, you will need to apply for a variance with the township and attend a hearing for permission.  This does not always work out in your favor.

 

Once you have found a property that is ideal for you and your horses, you are well on your way to making your dream of owning a horse farm come true.

 

 

 

Brigita McKelvie is a REALTOR®  (Pennsylvania License #RS297130) with Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, specializing in rural and horse properties and farms in Eastern Pennsylvania.  She has an e-Pro® (Certified Internet Expert) certification and a GRI (Graduate, REALTOR® Institute) designation.  

Brigita McKelvie, REALTOR

Pennsylvania License #RS297130

Rural and Horse Properties and Farms

 

Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, Ltd.Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, Ltd.

 

The Premier Equine and Country Real Estate firm serving Eastern Pennsylvania from back yard operations to world class equestrian facilities.

Use a REALTOR with "horse sense" that doesn't horse around when it comes to horse properties.

 

 

e-ProGRI (Graduate, REALTOR Institute)BNI

 

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Comment balloon 0 commentsBrigita McKelvie, Associate Broker • February 26 2016 10:48AM
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